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The Removal, Retention and Use of Human Organs and Tissue from Post-Mortem Examination (Department of Health)

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Published by Stationery Office Books (TSO) .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Health systems & services,
  • Medical ethics,
  • Medicolegal issues,
  • Pathology,
  • England,
  • Surgery - Plastic & Cosmetic,
  • Medical / Nursing

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages51
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10024850M
ISBN 100113225326
ISBN 109780113225323

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Get this from a library! The removal, retention and use of human organs and tissue from post-mortem examination: advice from the Chief Medical Officer.. [Great Britain. Department of Health.; Great Britain. Department for Education and Employment.; Great Britain. Home Office.;] -- Following public concern about the taking and retention of organs from post mortems on children, this report by. In February , the Chief Medical Officer (UK) issued advice on the removal and retention of organs and tissue at post-mortem examination which drew on the results of the Bristol and Alder Hey Inquiries.4 Its intention was to: "provide definitive advice which will enable a new beginning and start the process of restoring public confidence."5. Replaces Doc. No. Human Tissue - Consent for Donation of Regenerative Tissue by Young Children & Consent Form [PD_] Human Tissue-Use/Retention Including Organ Donation, Post-Mortem Examination and Coronial Matters [PD_] Author Branch Office of the Chief Health Officer Branch contact Office of the Chief Health Officer 02 In advice to the Government, The Removal, Retention and Use of Human Organs and Tissue from Post Mortem Examination published in , the Chief Medical Officer for. These notes refer to the Human Tissue Act (c. 30) which received Royal Assent on 15 November 2.

The removal, retention and use of human organs and tissue from post-mortem examination () Getting ahead of the curve: a strategy for combating infectious diseases () At least five a week: Evidence on the impact of physical activity and its relationship to health (). INTRODUCTION. The controversies that were exposed by the Inquiries in Bristol, 1 Alder Hey 2 and Scotland 3 following discovery of the unauthorised removal and retention of organs at post-mortem examination raised a number of serious professional and ethical questions. However, they also raised some interesting legal ones. Most particularly, questions arose around the terms of the existing law. The General Scheme will implement the relevant recommendations of the Report of Dr Deirdre Madden on Post Mortem Practice and Procedures relating to, inter alia, consent provisions for hospital post-mortems and provisions on the retention, storage, use and disposal of organs and tissue from deceased persons following a hospital post-mortem. Get this from a library! The removal, retention and use of human organs and tissue from post-mortem examination. [Great Britain. Department of Health.; Great Britain. Department for Education and Employment.; Great Britain. Home Office.;].

Deficiencies and shortfalls in the supply of human organs for transplantation and human tissue for research generate policy dilemmas across the world and have often given rise to major and deleterious controversies, such as those relating to organ and tissue retention practices following post-mortem examination. Tissue removed during a coroner’s post-mortem examination may also be seized by the police in the case of a suspicious death. Families must decide whether to proceed with the funeral or request to have the body stored until all tissue is repatriated.   Eg Human Tissue Act (Vic), s (3):‘An order by a coroner under the Coroners Act (Vic) directing a post-mortem examination is. authority for the use, for therapeutic, medical or scientific purposes, of tissue removed from the body of the deceased person for the purpose of the post-mortem examination’ (emphasis added). This. The furore over the retention of organs at postmortem examination, without adequate consent, has led to a reassessment of the justification for, and circumstances surrounding, the retention of any human material after postmortem examinations and operations. This brings into focus the large amount of human material stored in various archives and museums, much of which is not identifiable and.